Posts Tagged ‘digital humanities’

Dr. Ted Underwood, Associate Professor of English at the University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign,  will be publishing a book through the Stanford University Press that features research conducted for and with the SEASR project.

The book is entitled, “Why Literary Periods Mattered: Historical Contrast and the Prestige of English Studies” and is expected to be released in 2013.

The HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) hosted its first annual UnCamp September 10th and 11th at Indiana University, Bloomington. Session leaders included: Colin Allen (Indiana University), Loretta Auvil (University of Illinois), J. Stephen Downie (University of Illinois), Stacy Kowalczyk (Indiana University), Robert McDonald (Indiana University), Beth Plale (Indiana University), Yiming Sun (Indiana University), Ted Underwood (University of Illinois), and Jeremy York (HathiTrust). The keynote, HaithiTrust: Putting Research in Context was presented by John Wilkin, Executive Director, HaithiTrust.

Some of the sessions highlighted analysis workflows developed by the Software Environment for the Advancement of Scholarly Research (SEASR) project and provided information on digital humanities applications of SEASR. Loretta Auvil demonstrated SEASR during her presentations “Demonstrations of Capability” and her session on “SEASR Analytics”. She explained that the project focuses on developing, integrating, deploying, and sustaining a set of reusable and extendable software components and a supporting framework to benefit a broad set of data mining applications for scholars in the humanities. Loretta showed SEASR activities using Meandre workflows and guided participants through a hands on session.

Ted Underwood, an associate professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, gave a session on “Using HathiTrust Texts for Literary Research” which provided a specific use case of the SEASR project. He is converting 500,000 eighteenth and nineteenth century volumes downloaded from HathiTrust into a normalized collection that can be used for literary-historical research. He, along with several other contributors, is involved in cleaning data in deeper ways than simply looking at the typical errors that optical character recognition (OCR) is able to detect. Dr. Underwood and his team are also looking at problems and opportunities in terms of enriching data and cleaning metadata. Examples of metadata cleaning include: solving problems with dating a document, discarding duplicate volumes, and adding metadata that would be useful for interpretive process such as information on gender and genre.

HTRC UnCamp will be a yearly event highlighting demonstrations and hands on workshops for anyone who is interested in mining and analyzing large amounts of quantitative information.

Further information about HTRC including publications and .pdfs of HTRC UnCamp presentations can be found here: http://wiki.htrc.illinois.edu/display/OUT/HTRC+UnCamp2012

Loretta Auvil and other collaborators from the SEASR Services project are attending the Topic Modeling for Humanities Research Workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The workshop will be on Saturday, November 3, 2012 at the Maryland Institute for Technologies in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland.

The SEASR Team will participate in University of Victoria’s Digital Humanities Summer Institute on June 4-8, 2012. You can find information at http://www.dhsi.org/. The course entitled “SEASR Analytics” will be taught by Loretta Auvil and Boris Capitanu.

The course will provide an introduction to the SEASR analytics with hands-on training with the tools. We will cover an Introduction to text mining tools, and Using and creating Zotero flows, Topic Modeling and Concept Mapping.

Loretta Auvil attends Chicago Colloquium on Digital Humanities and Computer Science 2011 which occurred Nov. 20-21, 2011. With many of the collaborators from the SEASR Services project, a set of demonstrations were prepared as part of the Software Demonstration program. Our work with Matt Jockers from Stanford prompted the Topic Modeling demonstration. Our work with Ted Underwood on the Google Ngrams data and correlation analysis prompted the development of the web application, “Correlation Analysis and Ngram Viewer“. A paper describing the demonstration, “SEASR Analytics” is available here.

Ted Underwood, one of our collaborators on the SEASR Services project, also attended and presented,
“Combining topic-modeling and time-series approaches to reveal trends in 18th- and 19th-century discourse.” This paper is also available here.

The University of Victoria’s Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) was held on June 6-10, 2011. Loretta Auvil and Boris Capitanu taught the course entitled “SEASR in Action: Data Analytics for Humanities Scholar”. The slides and course materials for this workshop are at http://dev-tools.seasr.org/confluence/display/Outreach/DHSI-SEASR-2011.

The course covered the following topics: Overview of SEASR infrastructure (components, flows, applications), Introduction to text mining tools, and Using and creating Zotero flows, Topic Modeling and Concept Mapping.

The SEASR Team will participate in University of Victoria’s Digital Humanities Summer Institute on June 7-11, 2010. You can find information at http://www.dhsi.org/. The course entitled “SEASR in Action: Data Analytics for Humanities Scholar” will be taught by Loretta Auvil and Boris Capitanu.

The course will provide an introduction to the SEASR analytics with hands-on training with the tools.

Loretta Auvil of the SEASR Team presented an overview of SEASR at the Digital Humanities 101: Rethinking the Scholarly Enterprise Workshop at University of North Caroloina, Charlotte. The workshop was held by the Center for Humanities, Technology and Science on Friday, Oct. 9, 2009.

This workshop introduced faculty members to new research tools and approaches as well as funding opportunities available through the field of digital humanities. Guest speakers included Loretta Auvil, director of Software Environment for the Advancement of Scholarly Research; Kurt Fendt, director of HyperStudio at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Jason Rhody, project officer with the Office of Digital Humanities at the National Endowment for the Humanities; and Stan Ruecker, co-director of the Humanities Computing program at the University of Edmonton.

The presentation slides for SEASR can be found here.

The SEASR Team will participate in University of Victoria’s Digital Humanities Summer Institute on June 8-12, 2009.  You can find information at http://www.dhsi.org/. The course entitled “SEASR in Action: Data Analytics for Humanities Scholar” will be taught by Loretta Auvil and Boris Capitanu.

This course focuses on introducing participants to The Software Environment for the Advancement of Scholarly Research, SEASR, providing humanities, arts, and social science communities a transformational cyberinfrastructure technology. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about SEASR through a comprehensive set of presentations and hands-on exercises meant to outline the key aspects of the technology and how it can be applied to solve real-world research problems. SEASR eases scholars’ access to digital research materials and enhances scholars’ use of them through analytics that can uncover hidden information and connections. SEASR fosters collaboration, too, through empowering scholars to share data and research in virtual work environments. SEASR technology is also designed to enable digital humanities developers to design, build, and share software applications that support research and collaboration. Developers can tailor applications both in whole and part to fit scholars’ research needs—from changing the visualization landscapes that provide them with views of analytical results, to inserting new analytics that support their linguistic analysis for different time periods or languages, to readjusting entire steps in the work process so that researchers can validate results and alter their queries. The course will incorporate a variety of learning activities ranging from presentations to structured application sessions to designing specialized analyses. Topics will include: Overview of SEASR infrastructure (components, flows, applications), Introduction to text mining tools, and Using and creating Zotero flows.

SEASR co-PI Loretta Auvil will participate in the Mellon-funded Project Bamboo Workshop. With other higher education; museum and library; and organization, society, and agency leaders from across the U.S., she will attend the second session of The Planning Process & Understanding Arts and Humanities Scholarship workshop, which will be held from May 15-17, 2008 at the University of Chicago.

SEASR is twice mentioned in the Project Bamboo proposal, which sets as its goal formulating a strategic plan for enhancing the arts and humanities through the “development of shared technology services” (3). As one possible approach, the proposal recommends service-oriented architectures—such as SEASR’s—which emphasize ”being able to re-use and weave together loosely-coupled, discrete, specialized technology services that come from other providers and projects rather than building and managing all on one’s own.” The proposal goes on to say that “Critical to such an approach is the implementation of a web services framework. Such a framework is not a vertical application that focuses on a single in-depth function or a self-contained software tool used directly by a user, but rather a horizontally integrating set of technologies and set of core shared capabilities that enable the creation, aggregation, and reuse of services and resources among scholars, projects, and institutions” (15-16). The passage notes SEASR’s special strength in data analysis and mining tools.

In imagining a vision of the humanities researcher of the future and her work process, the Bamboo proposal turns to SEASR once again, envisioning a synthetic Bamboo composer that uses a visual programming environment similar to the one SEASR uses today in its workbench (20).